On this day: George Foreman scores savage first-round KO of Jose Roman in lady title safeguard

On this day: George Foreman scores savage first-round KO of Jose Roman in lady title safeguard

The challenger’s most memorable error preceded the initial chime.

On Sept. 1, 1973, George Foreman scored a staggering first-round knockout over the unheralded Jose “Lord” Roman to hold the heavyweight title of the world at the Nippon Budokan in Tokyo. The authority time was 2:00.

With under a moment gone in the initial round, Roman was taken off the floor by a strong right uppercut to the body. The Puerto Rican-conceived warrior eased off in clear pain and the issue at hand was at that point obvious to everyone – in English, Spanish and Japanese.

The primary knockdown came politeness of an abandoned snare that stored Roman level on his. And afterward things got appalling. Foreman was exceptionally fortunate not be scolded for a pummeling right uppercut that landed when his rival was down. At the point when Roman rose, he was gotten by a horrendous attack that finished in a legitimate right uppercut for the subsequent knockdown. Yet again game, however outgunned, an unstable Roman discovered real confidence just to be taken out totally by – you got it – a right uppercut.

This time, Roman remained out like a light and then some.

Before the battle, when official Jay Edson had given the two men their directions at ring focus, Roman woofed forcefully in front of Foreman. That encroachment was not trifled with by the hero, who doled out a shocking beating.

Having flooring the then-unbeaten Joe Frazier multiple times in two rounds to bring home the championship, Foreman was laid out as the most annihilating puncher in world boxing. The enormous Texan didn’t require added motivation to cause harm however that is precisely exact thing Roman gave.

This was the main heavyweight title battle to be organized in the Far East.

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